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  • Blog
  • 15th Mar 2021

Four messages that can increase uptake of the COVID-19 vaccines

More than one in four people in the US say they are unwilling to get the COVID-19 vaccine. That statistic is especially concerning because many are from the communities that have been hit hardest by the pandemic. There is an urgent public health need, therefore, not only for the vaccine…

  • Blog
  • 27th Jul 2020

Do nudges actually work?

Last year, we were sent a request that was intriguing, and a bit scary.  At BIT we spend a lot of time setting up Randomized Controlled Trials and other ways of evaluating impact reliably. We really care about finding out whether what we’re doing “works” - and where, when, and…

  • Blog
  • 5th Mar 2020

How to stop touching our faces in the wake of the Coronavirus

As COVID-19 cases spread across the globe, people are starting to get some consistent advice on what they can do to avoid the virus. In addition to washing their hands and coughing or sneezing into a tissue (or your elbow), people are being told to not touch their faces. The problem…

  • Blog
  • 20th Jun 2019

Creating opportunities for economic mobility in US cities

Integrating behavioural science into the heart of social programs

  • Blog
  • 5th Nov 2018

Behavioural science and policy: where are we now and where are we going?

The use of behavioural science in policy has exploded since the publication of Nudge in 2008 and the creation of BIT in 2010. We were asked to reflect on the team’s work for a new issue of Behavioural Public Policy, and we decided to be open about some of the…

  • Blog
  • 22nd Jun 2018

Policy tribes: How allegiances can harm policy making

This is the seventh blog in our Behavioural Government series, which explores how behavioural insights can be used to improve how government itself works. Why might members of one group involved in making policy reject the arguments coming from another group, even if they are good ones? This kind of “inter-group…

  • Blog
  • 14th Jun 2018

The illusion of similarity

This is the sixth blog in our Behavioural Government series, which explores how behavioural insights can be used to improve how government itself works. The “illusion of similarity” is where policy makers have inaccurate assumptions about what people think or know, and inaccurate predictions about how people will act. This can…

  • Blog
  • 8th Jun 2018

The problem with groups

This is the fifth blog in our Behavioural Government series, which explores how behavioural insights can be used to improve how government itself works. Thomas Hobbes, in one of the first modern treatises on government, recognised that, in groups, advisers are ‘not moved by their own sense, but by the…

  • Blog
  • 1st Jun 2018

What should government pay attention to?

This is the fourth blog in our Behavioural Government series, which explores how behavioural insights can be used to improve how government itself works. You might say - whatever the public cares about. The fact that people care about an issue is of course important in a democracy - no…

  • Blog
  • 25th May 2018

How confirmation bias stops us solving problems

This is the third blog in our Behavioural Government series, which explores how behavioural insights can be used to improve how government itself works. Confirmation bias is the tendency to seek out, interpret, judge and remember information so that it supports one's pre-existing views and ideas. Confirmation bias can make…