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  • Blog
  • 19th Dec 2017

Why ethics matter online

Introduction Aristotle was not on Snapchat. We can only speculate about what would have been on Lao Tzu's Tumblr. And Marcus Aurelius, mercifully, never had to update his Instagram Story. But although the world of apps and social media would have been alien to history’s great ethicists, the converse doesn’t…

  • Blog
  • 21st Dec 2017

BIT Partners Win $100 Million Grant from MacArthur Foundation

We are delighted to announce that our partners at the International Rescue Committee (IRC) and Sesame Workshop have been selected as the winners of the MacArthur Foundation’s 100&Change Challenge, a groundbreaking award providing $100 million to fund a critical problem facing the world today. IRC and Sesame Workshop have teamed…

  • Person

Johannes Lohmann

Johannes is BIT's Head of Work and Finance and oversees a portfolio that covers employment, organisational behaviour, household finance, and public sector innovation. Johannes previously led BIT's programme on economic mobility across 9 U.S. cities with Bloomberg Philanthropies. Before joining BIT, Johannes worked as CFO of Instiglio, a social organisation…

  • Blog
  • 2nd Feb 2018

A busy week for evidence builders

Five years of What Works Monday saw the publication of a 5-year update on the UK’s What Works Network. The event was hosted at the Institute for Government and introduced by Oliver Dowden, Minister for Implementation at the Cabinet Office. There’s a lot to be proud of. We’ve gone from…

  • Blog
  • 6th Feb 2018

One hundred years of votes for women: what next to close the gender gap in politics?

Behavioural science can offer a range of solutions for the political gender gap. One promising direction is to increase the visibility of female politicians that young women can identify with.

  • Blog
  • 2nd May 2018

Behavioural Government: A major new initiative from BIT

Confident about your own decision-making? Take the test. When we present our work or appear on panels, we’re often asked the same question: “But doesn’t government itself suffer from cognitive biases?” It’s an issue close to our hearts, given our origins in government. We first highlighted it in the MINDSPACE…

  • Blog
  • 11th May 2018

In the frame: how policy choices are shaped by the way ideas are presented

This is the second blog in our Behavioural Government series, which explores how behavioural insights can be used to improve how government itself works. ‘Framing effects’ are when people’s views about something change depending on how it is described. Adopting different frames can greatly affect how people perceive a problem…

  • Blog
  • 25th May 2018

How confirmation bias stops us solving problems

Even when people do get exposed to challenging information, confirmation bias can cause them to reject it and, perversely, become even more certain that their own beliefs are correct

  • Blog
  • 1st Jun 2018

What should government pay attention to?

This is the fourth blog in our Behavioural Government series, which explores how behavioural insights can be used to improve how government itself works. You might say - whatever the public cares about. The fact that people care about an issue is of course important in a democracy - no…

  • Blog
  • 22nd Jun 2018

Policy tribes: How allegiances can harm policy making

This is the seventh blog in our Behavioural Government series, which explores how behavioural insights can be used to improve how government itself works. Why might members of one group involved in making policy reject the arguments coming from another group, even if they are good ones? This kind of “inter-group…