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  • Blog
  • 14th Jul 2022

Combating panic buying with behavioural insights

Some of the memorable images of the COVID-19 pandemic were pictures of empty shelves in supermarkets, as shoppers panic bought in response to public health restrictions. Here in Australia, we’ve seen the country go in and out of major restrictions over the past couple of years, with panic buying occurring…

  • Blog
  • 8th Jul 2022

Encouraging employees to return to the office while maintaining flexibility and choice

Hybrid working is here to stay. Although many organisations offer hybrid work arrangements, there are still some ongoing challenges. Specifically, organisations have observed misalignment and even tension between managers and employees about their preferred number of days in the office. This is described in detail in the recent RMIT report,…

  • Blog
  • 23rd Jun 2022

Protecting consumers from greenwashing

These days everyone has “gone green” - or at least that’s the way it looks on the surface

  • Blog
  • 17th Jun 2022

Allowing fathers to be present

Fathers can be quite important. I’ve got a good one and am very grateful for it. The behavioural science evidence also backs me up. Early paternal participation has a positive impact on a child’s IQ, mental and physical health, career success, and happiness. When fathers do spend time with their…

  • Blog
  • 22nd Mar 2022

It pays to try public transport

In Australia, the tyranny of distance has led to a historical reliance on commuting by car. But small vehicles account for a total of 10% of Australia’s greenhouse gas emissions, and the emissions from these vehicles are as much as 40% higher than other countries. This comes in addition to…

  • Blog
  • 11th Feb 2022

Changing how young people behave online

This week marked Safer Internet Day, a global initiative which aims to raise awareness about online safety issues. This is a story that we hear frequently in the media: that the internet, especially social media, is an unsafe space, filled with dangerous content and cyber bullying. In particular, with technology…

  • Academic publication
  • 22nd Oct 2021

Using a randomised controlled trial to test the effectiveness of social norms feedback to reduce antibiotic prescribing without increasing inequities

We aimed to test whether a social-norm-based intervention successful elsewhere would have an effect on GPs with high prescribing rates of antibiotics. We also aimed to assess the effects on prescribing for Māori and Pacific patients.

  • Academic publication
  • 25th Sep 2021

I don’t get it, but I like it: Detailed pricing information increases confidence, but decreases quality of decision making

In collaboration with an energy regulator, we tested five versions of a potential Basic Plan Information Documents (BPID) for energy plans in an incentivized online framed field experiment.

  • Blog
  • 1st Sep 2021

Shouting into the void: The importance of engagement for safety messaging in the gig economy

In this time of COVID-19, we’ve seen the rise of a new hero: the food delivery worker (FDW). FDWs brave the streets and keep us well fed from our local restaurants as we move in and out of lockdowns. But the work of an FDW can be dangerous, and until…

  • Blog
  • 25th Aug 2021

“The Complaints Department”: A dozen years of debate on when and how to nudge

Last week Professor Richard Thaler and Professor Cass Sunstein published Nudge: The Final Edition. As many of our readers will know, BIT was built on the ideas developed and popularised in the original edition, and we have been hugely grateful for the inspiration, energy and guidance Richard and Cass have…